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Gustav Zhuravlev
Gustav Zhuravlev

DEBT ((EXCLUSIVE))



There are six datasets on Fiscal Data which include the national debt, which is referred to as Total Public Debt Outstanding (TPDO). TPDO is the sum of Debt Held by the Public and Intragovernmental (Intragov) Holdings. Some datasets include debt issued by the Federal Financing Bank (FFB). The datasets listed below only include debt issued by the Treasury Department. The list below provides information on where there are differences in debt calculations related to the national debt.




DEBT



Daily Treasury Statement (DTS) contains Debt Held by the Public and Intragov Holdings, but does not aggregate these two categories into TPDO. In this dataset, Intragov Holdings includes debt issued by the FFB. Dollar values for Debt Held by the Public and Intragov Holdings are rounded in millions to cohere with other data in the dataset. Please note that the published reports on the Fiscal Service site contain TPDO values.


Monthly Statement of the Public Debt (MSPD) contains TPDO, as well as a breakout of Debt Held by the Public and Intragov Holdings. In this dataset, Intragov Holdings includes debt issued by the FFB. Dollar values are rounded in millions to cohere with other data in the dataset.


Schedules of Federal Debt contains Debt Held by the Public and Intragov Holdings, but does not aggregate these two categories into TPDO. In this dataset, Intragov Holdings do not include debt issued by the FFB. Dollar values are rounded in millions to cohere with other data in the dataset.


Debt broken out by intragovernmental holdings and debt held by the public has not always been provided. Where this occurred, the dataset shows a value of $0.00 instead of a null value. Debt held by the public and intragovernmental holdings data is available yearly (on a fiscal basis) from 9/30/1997 through 9/30/2001, monthly from 9/30/2001 through 3/31/2005, and daily from 4/4/2005 to today. Some columns in this dataset overlap with the Monthly Statement of the Public Debt (MSPD), Monthly Treasury Statement (MTS), Daily Treasury Statement (DTS), and Schedules of Federal Debt datasets. Debt issued by the Federal Financing Bank (FFB) is included in the intragovernmental holdings in the Debt to the Penny dataset, but not in the Schedules of Federal Debt dataset because it is not debt managed by the Bureau of the Fiscal Service. The difference between these datasets is equal to the amount of debt issued by the FFB.


Debt is anything owed by one party to another. Examples of debt include amounts owed on credit cards, car loans, and mortgages."}},"@type": "Question","name": "What Is the Legal Definition of Debt?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "In terms of consumer debt, 15 U.S. Code Section 1692a defines it as "any obligation or alleged obligation of a consumer to pay money arising out of a transaction in which the money, property, insurance, or services which are the subject of the transaction are primarily for personal, family, or household purposes, whether or not such obligation has been reduced to judgment."","@type": "Question","name": "What Is the Difference Between Debt and a Loan?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Debt and loan are often used synonymously, but there are slight differences. Debt is anything owed by one person to another. Debt can involve real property, money, services, or other consideration. In corporate finance, debt is more narrowly defined as money raised through the issuance of bonds.A loan is a form of debt but, more specifically, an agreement in which one party lends money to another. The lender sets repayment terms, including how much is to be repaid and when, as well as the interest rate on the debt.","@type": "Question","name": "What Is the Difference Between Debt and Credit?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Debt is amount of money you owe, while credit is the amount of money you have available to you to borrow. For example, unless you have maxed out your credit cards, your debt is less than your credit."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsWhat Is Debt?How Debt WorksTypes of Consumer DebtTypes of Corporate DebtPros and Cons of DebtHow to Pay Off DebtWhat Are Examples of Debt?What Is the Legal Definition of Debt?What Is the Difference Between Debt and a Loan?What Is the Difference Between Debt and Credit?The Bottom LineCorporate FinanceCorporate DebtDebt: What It Is, How It Works, Types, and Ways to Pay BackBy


In terms of consumer debt, 15 U.S. Code Section 1692a defines it as "any obligation or alleged obligation of a consumer to pay money arising out of a transaction in which the money, property, insurance, or services which are the subject of the transaction are primarily for personal, family, or household purposes, whether or not such obligation has been reduced to judgment."


Debt and loan are often used synonymously, but there are slight differences. Debt is anything owed by one person to another. Debt can involve real property, money, services, or other consideration. In corporate finance, debt is more narrowly defined as money raised through the issuance of bonds.


A loan is a form of debt but, more specifically, an agreement in which one party lends money to another. The lender sets repayment terms, including how much is to be repaid and when, as well as the interest rate on the debt.


The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) assists active-duty military with financial burdens. Under this act, you may qualify for a reduced interest rate on mortgages and credit card debts. It can offer protection from eviction. It can also delay civil court, including bankruptcy, foreclosure, or divorce proceedings. To find out if you qualify, contact your local Armed Forces Legal Assistance office.


A debt collector generally is a person or company that regularly collects debts owed to others, usually when those debts are past-due. This includes collection agencies, lawyers who collect debts as part of their business, and companies that buy delinquent debts and then try to collect them. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) prohibits debt collectors from using abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices to collect from you.


The Act covers personal, family, and household debts. This includes money owed on personal credit card accounts, auto loans, medical bills, and mortgages. The FDCPA does not cover debts incurred in running a business.


Within five days after a debt collector first contacts you, the collector must send you a written notice that tells you the name of the creditor, how much you owe, and what action to take if you believe you do not owe the money. If you owe the money or part of it, contact the creditor to arrange for payment. If you believe you do not owe the money, contact the creditor in writing and send a copy to the collection agency informing them with a letter not to contact you.


If you're unable to pay your creditors, filing for bankruptcy can help you get a fresh start. Bankruptcy involves liquidating or selling off your assets to pay your debts. Or it can mean creating a payment plan. Before considering bankruptcy, you should first explore other debt management options. Bankruptcy information stays on a credit report for 10 years. It can also make it difficult to get credit, buy a home, get life insurance, or sometimes get a job. 041b061a72


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